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United States and Canada: Daylight Saving Time Extended Starting 2007

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Published 1-Mar-2007

Starting in 2007, the United States and Canada will start Daylight Saving Time (DST) on the second Sunday of March and end on the first Sunday of November.

United States and Canada: Daylight Saving Time Extended Starting 2007

Daylight saving time is extended in the United States and Canada.

©iStockphoto.com/Gordana Sermek

From 1987 to 2006, DST began on the first Sunday in April and ended on the last Sunday of October. This year, the start date is three or four weeks earlier and the end date is one week later, making Daylight Saving Time a total of four or five weeks longer. In 2007, DST will last four weeks longer than it had previously; in 2008, it will be five weeks longer. If the extension is not successful, the United States might make the decision to revert to the old changeover dates. The amendment for United States is described here: Energy Policy Act 2005.

34 Weeks of Daylight Saving Time

Previously, the number of weeks of Daylight Saving Time was not constant, depending on how early or late the first Sunday in April and last Sunday in October appeared. Since March and November of any given year always start on the same weekday, the duration of DST will now be the same every year. Standard time will be 18 weeks most years, and 19 weeks every fifth or sixth year.

Longest Period of Daylight Saving Time in the World

Most countries in Europe observe Daylight Saving Time from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October, and in recent years Europe typically has had the longest DST period in the world. The new changeover dates for the United States and Canada means that DST will last three or four weeks longer in those countries than in Europe.

Other Locations Changing March 11, 2007

These locations will also start DST on March 11:

Daylight Saving Time Started Early in 1974 and 1975

In 1974, Daylight Saving Time started early in United States, on January 6, following the Emergency Daylight Saving Time Energy Conservation Act of 1973. The plan was to have the United States in year-round Daylight Saving Time for two consecutive years, but it was later amended so that there was standard time between October 27, 1974, and February 23, 1975.

Dates of Daylight Saving Time 1970–2015

These are the dates Daylight Saving Time started and ended in most of the United States and the planned dates until 2015. There is a chance that future dates will change. Also, note that some locations do not observe DST, but those locations that do should use these common start and ending dates. Occasionally locations have changed their clocks on other dates.



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