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How to make a pinhole projector to view a solar eclipse

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One of the easiest and safest ways to view the Sun - eclipsed and uneclipsed - is to project its image on a screen using a pinhole camera or a pinhole projector. Here, we provide you instructions on how to quickly make a pinhole camera at home using common household items.

Solar eclipses explained

Basic pinhole projector

You will need:

What to do:

Do not look at the Sun through the pinhole or through the paper. When using this kind of projector, your back must be towards the Sun.

Pinhole projector using a box

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This type of pinhole projector works on the same principle as the basic one, except it is much sturdier, easier to set on a surface (no more aching arms holding out the two sheets of paper) and requires a few extra items to construct.

You will need:

What to do:

Projector using binoculars

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Pinhole projections tend to be small and fuzzy, and depend on the length of the box or tube you use and the size of the hole you make. A quickly assembled projector using binoculars or telescope can create bigger, sharper projections of the eclipse. Such a contraption uses the same concept as a pinhole projector using two sheets of paper. However, instead of a sheet with a hole, the Sun's image is projected through binoculars or a telescope.

You will need:

What to do:

Things to remember

Protect your eyes when viewing a solar eclipse

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